New recipes

Gluten free and dairy free Staffordshire oat cakes recipe

Gluten free and dairy free Staffordshire oat cakes recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Pancakes
  • Gluten free pancakes

This is my gluten free and dairy free version of the classic Staffordshire oat cake. I made these while craving "real" pancakes and they turned out quite nicely. If you are coeliac please make sure you buy certified gluten free oats.

11 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 400ml warm water
  • 350ml warm soya milk
  • 1 tablespoon light brown sugar
  • 1 satchet quick action yeast
  • 225g oat flour
  • 150g buckwheat flour
  • 100g gluten free plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:30min ›Extra time:1hr › Ready in:1hr45min

  1. Mix the water, soya milk, sugar and yeast in a large bowl. Mix well and leave for five minutes until it starts to froth.
  2. Mix the flours and the salt in a separate bowl.
  3. Beat the egg and add it to the milk and yeast mixture. Then add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and combine thoroughly.
  4. Cover with cling film and leave to stand for an hour (or longer) in a warm place while the yeast bubbles away.
  5. Take your mixture and test the consistency, it should be of a batter like thickness. If it is too thick add a little bit more water.
  6. Use a non-stick pan and place over a medium-high heat. My pan is quite new so I didn't need to use any oil, you may need to oil your pan depending on the surface.
  7. Make sure your pan is hot, and when it is add about two tablespoons of batter and swirl around the pan, it should be about the thickness of a pound coin.
  8. When you see bubbles appear on the top of the pancake (after about two minutes) you can flip it over for another two minutes.
  9. Transfer to a warm plate if eating straight away or onto a wire cake rack for cooling.

Tip

You can whizz oats in a blender to make the oat flour. If you are coeliac please make sure you buy certified gluten free oats.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(0)

Reviews in English (0)

More collections


Mix all the dry ingredients together. Add the salt and yeast on opposite sides of the bowl as the salt will kill the yeast otherwise. Stir in the milk and 250ml tepid water, cover and rest for an hour in a warm place.

Using some kitchen towel, smear a frying pan with a little butter over a medium heat. Pour in small amounts of batter, about a heaped dessert spoon, once bubbles start to form, flip over and cook for a couple of minutes on the other side and keep warm. Repeat using all the mixture to make 8 pancakes.

Stir the yoghurt with the lemon extract and then marble through the sugar and leave for 10 minutes for the sugar to dissolve.

To serve, place a couple of oatcakes on a plate, top with a little lemon yoghurt and finish with raspberries and blueberries. Repeat to make 4 servings. Perfect for a weekend brunch.


Paleo Sticky Sultana Cake

Gluten, grain and dairy free with a soft texture and a sticky orange glaze.

  • 60g dairy free spread
  • 120g soft brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp each of treacle and golden syrup
  • 250g sultanas
  • 2 eggs
  • 200g ground almonds
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of sofa
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • Juice of one orange
  • 4 heaped tablespoons of caster sugar
  1. Preheat an oven to 180C. Line a circular tin (standard
  2. Cream the butter, sugar, treacle and golden syrup.
  3. While doing this, heat 150g of the sultanas in 150ml hot water and bring to the boil. Leave to soften.
  4. Add the eggs to the butter mix one at a time.
  5. Add the ground almonds and the baking powder and mix well.
  6. Using a hand blender, puree the sultanas and water. Add the bicarb and mix well.
  7. Add this to the rest of of the mix along with the remaining sultanas.
  8. Place in the tin and bake for 20 minutes. Turn the heat down to 160C and bake for a further 20 minutes or until firm to the touch.
  9. Take the cake out of the oven but leave in the tin.
  10. Heat the orange juice and caster sugar until the sugar has dissolved.
  11. Use a cocktail stick to make holes all across the top of the cake and using a spoon pour the orange syrup over the top, a little at a time. Let the syrup trickle down the sides of the cake. Leave to cool completely.
  12. Enjoy.

Looking for something?

Recent photo

Dinner Party Starter: Ricotta & oozy egg yolk ravioli, Pea & mint puree, Asparagus, Fresh Peas, Lemon & sage butter.


Find products suitable for you

Coeliac UK is the charity for people who need to live without gluten. We provide independent, trustworthy advice and support so people can live well, gluten free.

Coeliac UK is a charity registered in England & Wales (1048167) & in Scotland (SC039804) & a company limited by guarantee in England & Wales (3068044). Logos are Trade Marks of Coeliac UK © 1974, 1980. All rights of translation and reproduction reserved.


Gluten Free

Because we believe oats are for everyone to enjoy, we have an ever-growing gluten free range designed with taste AND safety in mind. We have a dedicated 'state of the art' gluten free bakery and ensure the oats we use in our GF products are grown, farmed, milled and baked to the strictest standards, approved by Coeliac UK (this is an important point of difference to the oats used in our main oatcake range which, whilst naturally gluten free, could become contaminated by gluten bearing grains during growing or milling).

We've been champions of making new and delicious products for those who eat gluten free for well over a decade - so naturally, we've got a lot of expertise to share! Our award winning products taste so good, you'd never know they were gluten free. Try for yourself and let us know what you think!

With a great choice of versatile savoury biscuits, tasty tea time staples to have with a cuppa and handy on-the-go snacks perfect for popping in your bag, you can find us in the Free From Aisle or in our online shop.


Paleo Sticky Sultana Cake

Gluten, grain and dairy free with a soft texture and a sticky orange glaze.

  • 60g dairy free spread
  • 120g soft brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp each of treacle and golden syrup
  • 250g sultanas
  • 2 eggs
  • 200g ground almonds
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of sofa
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • Juice of one orange
  • 4 heaped tablespoons of caster sugar
  1. Preheat an oven to 180C. Line a circular tin (standard
  2. Cream the butter, sugar, treacle and golden syrup.
  3. While doing this, heat 150g of the sultanas in 150ml hot water and bring to the boil. Leave to soften.
  4. Add the eggs to the butter mix one at a time.
  5. Add the ground almonds and the baking powder and mix well.
  6. Using a hand blender, puree the sultanas and water. Add the bicarb and mix well.
  7. Add this to the rest of of the mix along with the remaining sultanas.
  8. Place in the tin and bake for 20 minutes. Turn the heat down to 160C and bake for a further 20 minutes or until firm to the touch.
  9. Take the cake out of the oven but leave in the tin.
  10. Heat the orange juice and caster sugar until the sugar has dissolved.
  11. Use a cocktail stick to make holes all across the top of the cake and using a spoon pour the orange syrup over the top, a little at a time. Let the syrup trickle down the sides of the cake. Leave to cool completely.
  12. Enjoy.

Looking for something?

Recent photo

Dinner Party Starter: Ricotta & oozy egg yolk ravioli, Pea & mint puree, Asparagus, Fresh Peas, Lemon & sage butter.


But Kellie, I don’t have a sourdough starter!

If you don’t have sourdough starter and wish to make these, why not try either my friend Jac’s nearly traditional Staffordshire oatcake recipe, or one from Felicity Cloake at The Guardian newspaper? Traditional recipes use either dried or fresh yeast and are quicker to make. You can also find the history of the Staffordshire oatcake on their sites.

Have you heard of Staffordshire oatcakes? what’s your favourite way to eat them? Are you a sourdough bread baker? Do you experiment with the starter too? What are you making with it?

**Remember to follow me on Pinterest and, if you make my Sourdough Staffordshire Oatcakes, click on the pin below the recipe card and leave a photo of your make with a comment telling me what you think, or any awesome changes that you made. Similarly, any Instagram posts tagged @food_to_glow using my recipes will go on my Story if I see them. I’m always so proud when you share my recipes with the world. Yay.

Whether on Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or of course here on the blog, I love to see what you do with my recipes, and I welcome your comments, star ratings, tweaks and suggestions.**


  • 200 grams porridge oats (fine)
  • 200 grams plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • dried yeast (one sachet)
  • 425 millilitres warm water
  • 425 millilitres milk (mix with water)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 7 ounces quick-cooking oats (fine)
  • 7 ounces all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • dried yeast (one sachet)
  • 15 fluid ounces warm water
  • 15 fluid ounces milk (mix with water)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar

Oatcakes

We’re big fans of oats in our house. From the daily porridge requests each morning, too endlessly trying to perfect flapjack (which I will finally share when I eventually do!), we just can’t get enough of those little super-grains. If there’s one oat classic that always feels a little bit special to me, it is Oatcakes.

I think it’s the fact we’re usually known to indulge in them with some posh cheese and nice chutney, so whenever we do have Oatcakes I always end up feeling like it’s a special occasion. The funny thing is though, that their origins are anything but fancy oatcakes were actually first produced as a more sustainable substitute to bread for us folk up here in Scotland. Plus they’re super cheap to make and super easy also! A mere three ingredients, with a little salt and a dash of water, and you’re good to go.

We actually stay just a stone’s throw away from the factory of one of Scotland’s best loved oatcakes but with these being so simple and delicious, I think we’ll be opting to make them ourselves when it comes to gifting them within hampers at Christmas. Plus I’m a sucker for a good Scottish recipe so these do the job in making me feel all patriotic just fine.

Granny’s Top Tips
♥ Porridge oats are our favourite for Oatcakes but you can experiment with different types of oats for different textures.
♥ A lot of Oatcakes recipes call for Bicarbonate Soda or Baking Powder, however with the absence of any acid there’s no real need for these ingredients.
♥ Why not try adding a little grated cheese or some poppy seeds to your oatcakes for varying flavours?


Related Video

These are oatmeal cookies, not oatcakes at all.

Oatcakes are like a savoury cracker. They do not contain sugar. Whatever this recipe is attempting to achieve, the end product will not be what is termed an oatcake. if you want an oat "cookie" put sugar in it. An oatcake does not contain sugar, nor buttermilk. I wanted to rate this as zero but it was not permitted. from Scotland

As per the suggestion of others, I decreased the sugar in this recipe: instead of 1/2 c. white sugar, I added 1/3 c. lightly packed brown sugar, because I like my oatcakes to have that slightly molassesy taste. I also substituted whole wheat flour for the white and used butter instead of shortening. And because I was low on rolled oats, I used only steel cut, which I pulsed in the food processor to ensure the oatcake outcome wouldn't be too mealy. Finally, I added a whack of seeds to the dough ¿ pumpkin, sesame, poppy, flax ¿ since I'm in love with the seedy oatcakes made by a local cafe. The result is delicious! Next time I'll roll them a little thicker so that they're chewy in the middle while crisp on the outside. This recipe is a keeper!

I have to agree with some of the earlier reviews. These taste more like oatmeal cookies than oatcakes. The next time I'll cut down on the vegetable shortening (they spread a bit too much on baking) and omit most of the sugar.

These are very good. I only add half the sugar. I like to add mini chocolate chips or date puree(put a bit between 2 cutouts before cooking) or dipped in chocolate.

I've made this recipe twice. The second time I doubled it, added three tablespoons of honey, but forgot to add any sugar. Loved it! Made the cakes in mini muffins tins.

For my own personal taste, I found these a bit sweet--other than that they are excellent. Next time I will halve the sugar. I also made substitutions to make these both dairy and gluten free (I used Earth Balance in place of the butter, So Delicious Unsweetened Coconut milk for the buttermilk, gluten free oats and a cup of gluten free flour blend with 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Rather than rolling and cutting, I formed them into balls with my hands and flattened them with my fingers on parchment lined baking sheets. Bake time was the same.

Love these! Used 1/3c brown sugar and 1/2c greek yogurt instead of buttermilk and they were perfect! The only problem I had was that they were impossible to roll out. so I spooned them onto the sheet and then flattened. Definitely a keeper!

Pleasing to eat and easy to make. But sweeter and more like a regular oatmeal cookie than expected, just not quite as cloying or rich. Will try a recipe with less (or no) sugar next time.

Although I really enjoyed these, they are nothing like a genuine Scottish oatcake, which traditionally contains only oatmeal (steel cut is close but a bit too chunky - Scottish pinhead is difficult to find in America), salt, fat - traditionally bacon fat or lard, and water. They should be slightly crumbly and nutty- flavoured. When I used to cook for a living, we produced zillions of these to go with the cheeseboard after dinner - which, since we were an ultra-traditional establishment, had Cheddar, Stilton and Caboc, no other cheese.

I used steel-cut oats rather than oatmeal and got a chewier biscuit. I also doubled the salt (used celtic seasalt) and baking soda, and put the sugar to 1/3c. I think I would put the baking soda at 3/4tsp next time, as I could taste it slightly.

My ten year old daughter made these for our Burn's Supper and they were wonderful. We served them after the haggis for the cheese course with an aged white cheddar and they were devoured! Next time we will be sure to double the recipe.

This recipe was excellent-- I made it with half butter and half vegetable shortening and skim instead of buttermilk. It was so easy: the dough held together well when I roled it out and the rounds crisped up in the oven. A big hit!

This is one of my favorite quick breakfasts - I don't like very sweet breakfast food, and it's kind of like a cross between a scone and a cookie. My son loves to make these with me, they're pretty easy, but can burn, so you have to watch them in the oven.

these are the best oatmeal cookies!

My son had a project due on Scotland and I searched this website for something other then shortbread that he could make. These were very easy to make and very tasty also. They were so good the whole batch was wiped out at school and I have to make some for us!

Last weekend I hosted a May Day party for several friends and made these oatcakes -- bannock or oatcakes are an ancient Celtic tradition for that day. I've never had a recipe so demanded -- and the suggestion to serve with chutney and stilton was excellent. A guest from Northumberland thought the combination spot on (we also had gorgonzola as an alternative.) Perhaps best of all, the South Beach Diet/Weight Watchers folk in the groups could eat the oatcakes. I substituted butter for shortening to avoid trans-fatty acids, and one could use Splenda instead of the sugar. These were excellent with the May Wine (reisling and woodruff) as well.

I had oatcakes topped with Stilton and chutney at a teahouse, and these were exactly what I was trying to duplicate. Not too sweet, but not bland, not too chewy and not too crispy. Just right!

very good, not too sweet and and excellent "to go" breakfast, texture reminded me of a biscuit.

These are like slightly sweet and dry tea biscuits. (Are Scottish oatcakes supposed to be like that?) If I make them again, I will increase the buttermilk/shortening slightly. That may help bring the dough together more easily as well. Be careful about baking time even though I used an insulated baking pan, the bottoms got a little burnt even though the tops were still deceptively pale.

I really like these either for quick breakfast or snack - they are satisfying, keep well, are easy to make, and are not overly sweet.

Substituted 1/2 c. old fashioned oats with 1/2 c. steel-cut oats -- still delicious.


Watch the video: Madkursus Glutenfri, Sukkerfri, Mælkefri, Vegetarisk v. Susanne Vang Coaching 11 okt 14 (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Zaine

    In my opinion you are wrong. I offer to discuss it. Write to me in PM, we'll talk.

  2. Mikalmaran

    Helpful question

  3. Hutton

    I congratulate, what an excellent message.

  4. Shakagis

    You not the expert?

  5. Agoston

    I think this is a great idea.

  6. Dazragore

    This message is awesome))), I'm wondering :)



Write a message